Location

1423 Powhatan St., Suite 1
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
Phone (703) 836-6727
Fax (703) 836-7491
Email: asnehq@navalengineers.org

 

ASNE is the leading professional engineering society for engineers, scientists and allied professionals who conceive, design, develop, test, construct, outfit, operate and maintain complex naval and maritime ships, submarines and aircraft and their associated systems and subsystems.  ASNE also serves the educators who train the professionals, researchers who develop related technology, and students who are preparing for the profession.  Society activities provide support for the U.S. Navy; U.S. Coast Guard; U.S. Marine Corps; U.S. Merchant Marine and U.S. Army.

ASNE is the seventh oldest technical society in the United States.  It was founded in 1888 by a group of naval engineering pioneers, most of them officers of the U.S. Navy's Engineering Corps, who sought a unified approach to their profession in order to make the most of new advances in technology. The purposes of ASNE are:           

  • to advance the knowledge and practice of naval engineering in public and private applications and operations,
  • to enhance the professionalism and well-being of members, and
  • to promote naval engineering as a career field.

For 125 years, the Society’s objectives have been strengthened and preserved to meet the changing needs of a time-honored profession. Today ASNE conducts a variety of technical meetings and symposia, publishes the highly regarded Naval Engineers Journal and a number of other technical proceedings and publications, and fosters professional development and technical information exchange through technical committees, local section activities and cooperative efforts with government organizations and other professional societies.

The Society's annual meeting, ASNE Day, is typically held in February of each year in the Washington, DC, area. The meeting features major addresses by high level industry and government leaders and panel discussions by leading members of the profession.  It also includes presentation and discussion of technical papers on a variety of timely naval engineering topics, presentation of the Society's prestigious annual awards and a large exposition with government and industry exhibits covering the full spectrum of naval engineering technology. ASNE Day is highlighted by the Society’s annual Honors Gala, attended by hundreds of executives and senior managers from both government and industry.

Our website is designed to not only serve our members, but also to support scholars, students and others interested in the varied field of naval engineering.  We welcome your suggestions on ways we can improve your experience. 


 

Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under grant N00014-17-1-3142 

SpringBreak

Welcome to day 2 of naval engineering at home!

Yesterday

Today

Tomorrow

We got familiar with the FLEET program and use the tests to begin engineering our boat. We discussed at least one engineering process, and you created a representation of your process. We will use that a lot today! You can still email us at fleet@navalengineers.org.

Today we will dive deeper! We will investigate working on ships, and dive deeply into the search and rescue mission. Check out the schedule below. The schedule is very flexible, so feel free to watch the videos at a different time or spend more time on a favorite project.

Tomorrow's goal will be to take today's process of understanding the search and rescue mission to another mission. Today you will be an engineer; tomorrow you will be a more practiced engineer.


School Break + Gaming!!

Today's goals:

  1. Regularly use an engineering design process.
  2. Understand how engineers use testing to improve designs.
  3. Set a personal high score on the Search & Rescue mission in FLEET.

Dinner time conversation topic:

If a boat was sinking, how would you rescue the people on the boat?

The Navy Band plays The Star-Spangled Banner:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zIrUEwvsf08

 

The Navy Band plays America The Beautiful:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WBEDZkfYegs

 

A video of lifesavers practicing Search & Rescue using the helicopter:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-IPERJ-p4qU

 

Search & Rescue Practice: There are two people waiting for you by the buoy. This test is great practice for using the different rescue boats and helicopters! (To add a helicopter, first add a "helo deck" from the Advanced menu, then the helicopters will appear in the Advanced menu)

 

If you haven’t already downloaded the game, you can download it at: http://www.navalengineers.org/Students/FLEET/Download-FLEET

Objective: Design a process that can quickly save shipwrecked sailors that are miles away from harbor.

Details: You receive a call over the phone lines or radio waves that a ship is going down three miles away. What do you need to go rescue those people? What are the steps your team should take to save them quickly and safely?

You will pitch your ideas to the Coast Guard in a one-minute presentation. The Coast Guard will want to know what variables students considered and how students plan to test their design. Think about how you would rescue shipwrecked sailor miles from the harbor. Draft some ideas. Do some research. Consider ways to improve your initial designs.

Important Tool: Use your engineering design process from yesterday! Even though this activity is more of a thought experiment, the process will still guide you through the steps to design an initial process and then improve it.

Final Product:Create a poster or one-minute long video that presents your solution. You can upload your solutions to the FLEET Discussion forum: http://www.navalengineers.org/Membership/Forum

Video Game Time!

Design and build a stable ship that can rescue a group of shipwrecked mariners. Use the Search & Rescue practice and the Search & Rescue mission to collect data and hone your solution.

Make sure you stay under budget, stay close to design displacement, and have all the necessary equipment. Remember, you need to get the men out of the water as quickly as possible. Salvaging their sinking ship is a bonus.

To access the mission, make sure you go to Mission Headquarters, and select "Search & Rescue"

 

Mission Objectives

1.     Find the fishing boat.

2.     Recover the mariners.

3.     Salvage the boat (optional).

 

The boat is about 1.5 nautical miles from the dry dock so you will need a fast ship in heavy seas. Then, you will need Rescue Equipment to quickly pull the mariners from the water. You may also have money to pay for the Pump Equipment.

 

You can find more information at: http://www.navalengineers.org/STEM-FLEET/Missions

 

Be sure to pay attention to the Achievements that are possible to boost your score.

Interested in learning more about search and rescue?

A.    The United States National Search and Rescue Supplement (link below) has 243 pages describing Search and Rescue missions. The glossary of terms on page xiii is particularly good:

https://kyem.ky.gov/InlandSARPlanning/Documents/National%20SAR%20Supplement%20(NSS).pdf

B.    Search and Rescue as a job is shown by this report by ABC in Virginia Beach. You can make connections between the practice of these professionals with the testing done by engineers because both give feedback and experience used to create a great final product. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Io_c_GxiwAM

Here are some entertaining videos if you are interested in some lunchtime viewing. You may also choose to review some of the engineering process videos below.

-       Explanation of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLSL8fcs32g

-       The life of a nuclear reactor engineer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yvyi1QsG8uk

-       U.S. Navy “A” School: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IZAk54G3yv0

Review of one possible Engineering Design process

  1. Ask: https://youtu.be/Oy1DrYTfwiI
  2. Imagine: https://youtu.be/laPUvKFP-GY
  3. Planning: https://youtu.be/bYxO3iXfu-Y
  4. Creating: https://youtu.be/VzVJbGucZw8
  5. Experiment: https://youtu.be/lCXIhe66pfs
  6. Improve: https://youtu.be/Kt1oVv2D_ns

 

Interested in another engineering process?

Check out the Engineering Design Process from the Massachusetts Department of Education

This activity is best in a sink with a stopper. You only need to fill the sink with 1-2 inches of water. Just enough so that the cup floats.

Objective 1: Imagine your cup is the aircraft carrier the USS Gerald R. Ford. Your boat weighs millions of pounds but you want to work on the bottom of the hull. Design a solution to this problem. The pictures below show our experiment.

               

their design. Think about how you would rescue shipwrecked sailor miles from the harbor. Draft some ideas. Do some research. Consider ways to improve your initial designs.

Important Tool: Use your engineering design process from yesterday! Even though this activity is more of a thought experiment, the process will still guide you through the steps to design an initial process and then improve it.

Final Product:Create a poster or one-minute long video that presents your solution. You can upload your solutions to the FLEET Discussion forum: http://www.navalengineers.org/Membership/Forum

Objective 2: Our cup kept tipping over during our activity, so we add some water inside the cup. Explain whether you think this solution is effective or not.

            

What part of the game is a good answer for Objective 1? (Highlight the space below to reveal our solution after you have your own answer.)

 

The dry dock on the first cut screen. Our solution was to pull the stopper on the sink so there was no more water around the boat. If you built a structure around the boat, that is what holds the boat upright in the dry dock.

 

What part of the game is a good example of the solution in Objective 2? (Highlight the space below to reveal our solution after you have your own answer.)

 

This solution is the same idea behind the ballast tanks. Ballast tanks add weight to the boat to increase stability.

Continue your work from this morning to in the Search & Rescue mission. Be sure to use your engineering process and collect data along the way. This data will be important for you to analyze for trends.

Remember at the additional resources in the Logbook and online at: http://www.navalengineers.org/STEM-FLEET/Missions

Unpack what happened today

Consider these questions:

  • What made your boat move faster?
  • What made the rescues easier?
  • What engineering steps made it easier to improve your solutions?
  • Does your engineering design process need to be tweaked?
  • Are you organizing data so it will be useful tomorrow
  • If you want to share, you can upload a file, a picture, or a link to a YouTube video that shows how you are using your engineering process. Be sure to share the end result of your day on the FLEET Discussion forum (http://www.navalengineers.org/Membership/Forum) so others can benefit from your thinking.

    As you may remember, we have a dinner-time discussion question. Today's question is "If a boat was sinking, how would you rescue the people on the boat?"

    The idea behind the question is that you thought about it this morning without using the mission. Then, you used the mission. Now you have some ideas about how the Navy organizes Search & Rescue, AND you might have some improvements that you decided. Think about your work today and how to approach this mission.

    You are improving your boat using a simulator exactly like naval engineers would. People will want to start learning about these unique experiences. Continue to learn and explore. Tomorrow we will do even more exciting things with your ship!

 

A Touch of History

Grace Hopper was a pioneer in computer science and a fiery leader within the U.S. Navy. Her work on COBOL literally transformed the world and enabled this digital age. Click here to learn more about her amazing life including the very first computer bug!


What is FLEET?

The Future Leaders in Experience-based Engineering and Technology (FLEET) program is an innovative, competitive ship design video game for students interested in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). This program was piloted with great success last year and we are now engaging interested schools and organizations to participate this school year. Students will be challenged to make realistic ship design decisions for Navy vessels that will be used to complete various missions.

You can find FLEET curricula under "For Educators" in the left margin, and our demo activities are listed below in our "Past Events." More information can be found using the navigation buttons to the left, scrolling down to the FAQs, or by downloading the:

Download FLEET (It's completely free)

The FLEET program is downloadable below. First, you will need to create an account on this website. This account will give you information to the Help Desk and the educational resources.  Then, you will download and install FLEET on your machine. FLEET has its own server so you will create a brand new FLEET account that you can see on high-score boards when you master naval engineering!

The game runs on Windows. The minimum system requirements for FLEET are:

  • Internet Connection: Cable or DSL
  • Operating System: Windows 7+
  • Processor: 2-GHz 32-bit or 64-bit 
  • Memory: 4GB
  • Screen Resolution: 1024×768 pixels
  • Graphics Card: DirectX 9.0c compatible card
  • Latest Version: February 7, 2018